Image Credit: shutterstock

Image Credit: shutterstock

Society and Culture, Education

CAP says the Common Core is a manufactured crisis

It would seem like the most straightforward explanation of the public’s interest in the Common Core is that 45 states and the District of Columbia (educating some 40 million-plus students) chose to align their K-12 instruction to the standards. That’s more than 40 million reasons for parents to care. Not so, says Max Marchitello. read more >

Image Credit: Shutterstock
Society and Culture, Education

The price of pre-K in 2016 might be higher than you think

As mid-term election season rolls around and presidential hopefuls look ahead to 2016, conservatives are asking the question: what to do about universal pre-K? It’s an important question. Over the past couple of years, a number of red and blue states across the country have joined the pre-K bandwagon, including Republican strongholds like Oklahoma and Georgia. And the trend might continue: last month, the Obama administration announced its new Preschool Grant Program in which states are eligible for a chunk of $250 million to build or expand preschool programs. read more >

Image Credit: The White House, Wikimedia Commons
Society and Culture, Education

Still waiting for Superman

If there’s one thing that’s important for good schools, it’s good teachers. That’s the central point of Davis Guggenheim’s widely-acclaimed documentary, “Waiting for Superman,” released four years ago today. Yet, as the film vividly depicted, it’s virtually impossible to dismiss poorly performing teachers in many public school systems across the country. Four years later, the issue raised by the film is still one of the most serious problems facing public schools. read more >

Image Credit: Maryland GovPics (Flickr) (CC-BY-2.0)
Society and Culture, Education

When Catholic schools close, poor communities suffer (and crime goes up)

For decades, research on Catholic schools has almost exclusively examined their academic effects. Brinig and Garnett take a novel tack. Rather than wade into academic effects, they use a rich data set of social cohesion measures and crime data from Chicago, Philadelphia, and Los Angeles to track the effect of closing Catholic schools on neighborhoods. Not to spoil the ending, but closing Catholic schools rends the fabrics of low income communities and can be linked to an increase in crime. read more >