100114Tcherneva
Pethokoukis, Economics, U.S. Economy

Why the ‘most important chart about the American economy you’ll see this year’ has big problems

Bard College economist Pavlina Tcherneva has cooked up a frightening and much-shared income-inequality chart (see above) — “the most important chart about the American economy you’ll see this year,” according to Vox — that seems to confirm the worst: America has become a winner-take-everything society. read more >

Pethokoukis, Economics, U.S. Economy

‘Gone with the Wind’ and the case for shorter copyright terms

Over at Pacific Standard, Noah Berlatsky writes about the strange copyright case of Alice Randall’s 2001 “The Wind Done Gone,” a parody of “Gone with the Wind.” Berlatsky notes that “a district court at first forbade publication of ‘The Wind Done Gone,’ arguing the work was a sequel rather than a parody, and therefore didn’t warrant fair-use protection.” read more >

Image Credit: shutterstock.com
Economics, U.S. Economy

Your retirement crisis, in 2 charts

In today’s Wall Street Journal, Syl Schieber and I return to the question of whether Americans face a “retirement crisis,” as many articles and organizations have claimed. The first chart is from the OECD and compares the income of retirees in a given country to the average income in that country. This isn’t a “replacement rate” as generally understood in the US, but it does show the relative well-being of workers and retirees. read more >

Credit: Jim Henderson/Creative Commons
Pethokoukis, Economics, U.S. Economy

The automation danger no one’s talking about

n a recent TechRepublic piece, reporter Erin Carson points out various myths about driverless cars. One of them involves passenger passivity. Although the eventual goal is that your car can motor to the office while you kick back and work on the Penske file or watch a movie, that won’t happen for a while. Carson notes that “despite systems that keep a car in its lane, for example, manufacturers are expecting that car owners will be paying attention with a hand on the wheel and a foot near the brake.” read more >