Andrew Biggs

Andrew G. Biggs is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, DC. Prior to joining AEI he was the principal deputy commissioner of the Social Security Administration (SSA), where he oversaw SSA's policy research efforts and led the agency's participation in the Social Security Trustees working group. In 2005 he worked on Social Security reform at the National Economic Council and in 2001 was on the staff of the President's Commission to Strengthen Social Security. Andrew’s work at AEI focuses on Social Security reform, state and local government pensions, and comparisons of public and private sector compensation. His work has appeared in academic publications as well as outlets such as the Wall Street Journal, New York Times and Washington Post, and he has testified before Congress on numerous occasions. He holds a Bachelors degree from the Queen's University of Belfast, Masters degrees from Cambridge University and the University of London and a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics.
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Economics, U.S. Economy

Your retirement crisis, in 2 charts

In today’s Wall Street Journal, Syl Schieber and I return to the question of whether Americans face a “retirement crisis,” as many articles and organizations have claimed. The first chart is from the OECD and compares the income of retirees in a given country to the average income in that country. This isn’t a “replacement rate” as generally understood in the US, but it does show the relative well-being of workers and retirees. read more >

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Economics, Entitlements

Better no Social Security replacement rates than wrong replacement rates

Boston College economist Alicia Munnell’s recent writings on Social Security replacement rates – along with a defensive paper recently released by Social Security’s actuaries – have a “move on, nothing to see here” quality: SSA’s actuaries follow “international standards” and it’s just bad guys – like me, and presumably those arch-conservatives who make up Social Security’s Board of Trustees – trying to spoil a good retirement for everyone by removing replacement rates from the annual Trustees Report. In fact, there’s a lot to see on the replacement rates question, if you’re willing to look. read more >