Carpe Diem

Charts of the day, world manufacturing output, 2012

mfg1

mfg2The charts above are based on new data from the United Nations on GDP and its components for more than 200 countries, updated through 2012. Here are some highlights of the UN’s data update:

1. The top chart compares the annual manufacturing output from 1970 to 2012 (measured in current US dollars) for the five countries that produced the most manufacturing output last year: China, US, Japan, Germany, and Korea.  As I reported last year, China officially became the world’s largest manufacturer in 2011, with output in 2011 ($2.34 trillion) that was 20.6% higher than the $1.94 trillion (updated) of factory output in the U.S. In 2012, China’s manufacturing output increased by 9.7% to $2.556 trillion, while factory output in the US increased by 2.6% to $1.993 trillion. For the second year in a row, China was the world’s largest manufacturer and out-produced the US by 28.2%. Previously, China’s manufacturing output exceed German’s factory output in 2000, and Japan’s output in 2006.

2. The U.S. is still a world leader in manufacturing and America’s factory output continues to increase, despite the rise of China to the world’s No. 1 manufacturer. The bottom chart above puts the enormous size of the U.S. manufacturing sector into perspective, by comparing America’s manufacturing output in 2012 ($1.993 trillion) to the combined manufacturing output of Germany, Korea, Italy, Russia, Brazil and India, which are the countries that are ranked No. 4 through No. 9 in 2012 for manufacturing output.

3. It’s also important to remember that China’s manufacturing workforce is estimated to be around 100 million and could be as high as 110 million, compared to America’s manufacturing employment of slightly more than 12 million. Therefore, even though China is producing more manufacturing output than the US, the productivity of American factory workers is so high compared to China, that China needs almost ten factory workers for every one American worker to produce 28% more output. On a per worker basis, the average American factory was responsible for $166,000 of output in 2012, while the average Chinese factory was responsible for less than $26,000 of manufacturing output; the productivity of American factory workers was more than six times that of the average worker in China.

4. Also noteworthy was the fact that South Korea produced more manufacturing output than Italy last for the first time ever, and moved ahead of Italy to become the world’s No. 5 largest manufacturing nation last.  Also noteworthy: India’s factory output exceeded manufacturing production in France for the second straight year, which moved India into ninth place for both 2011 and 2012.

110 thoughts on “Charts of the day, world manufacturing output, 2012

  1. I see the charts, and they are constant current dollars…and I know anecdotes are not the way to be an economist…but really, USA manufacturing output has quadrupled since about 1980?

    Other than heavily subsidized, regulated and protected food, and lately oil, what is made in the USA? Even cars “made” here have components from offshore or Mexico…I guess we have airplanes…natural gas-related industries…goods too heavy or light or bulky or law-value to ship, like styrofoam cups and paint…

    China now 28 percent larger than the USA manufacturing wise? Holy smokes. That happened in a hurry.

    Are we sure that free enterprise beats fascist central planning and an accommodative central bank?

    And when China is double our size, will we still be sure? I guess that will take another three-four years…

    • Benjamin Cole: “what is made in the USA?”

      Can’t answer yet for 2012, but the Bureau of Economic Advisors lists these as the top ten manufacturing sectors in 2011 (value added in $ billions):

      Chemical products………………………………….$253
      Computer and electronic products……………….$227
      Food and beverage and tobacco products………$215
      Petroleum and coal products……………………..$169
      Machinery……………………………………………$132
      Fabricated metal products………………………..$122
      Other transportation equipment…………………..$94
      Miscellaneous manufacturing………………………$80
      Motor vehicles, bodies and trailers, and parts….$77
      Plastics and rubber products………………………$69

      http://www.bea.gov/industry/gdpbyind_data.htm

      A few comments about this list:

      1. These dollars represent the value added by manufacturing operations in the U.S. It does not include the value of imported components used in that manufacturing process – only the value added. So these totals do not include, for example, the auto components produced in countries such as Mexico.

      2. “Other transportation equipment includes not only aircraft but also rail cars,

      3. “Petroleum and coal products” does not include the value of extracting petroleum and coal, only the value added by such operations as refineries.

      4. “Computer and electronic products” has grown in real dollars by 32% since the supposedly technology boom year 2000.

      It is a huge mistake to think that everything of high value is produced in Asian countries.

      • U.S. trade deficit in goods with advanced technology products, Census.

        Chart manufacturing in relative (per GDP) terms to analyze cross-country manufacturing intensity.

        • Marmico,

          What is your point about trade deficits? Do you understand how the dollars in trade deficits and the dollars in value added GDP represent very different goods and services? Do you also understand how the U.S. current account deficit (which is almost completely composed of the trade deficit) is balanced by the U.S. capital account surplus?

          • marmico: “What is your point about computers and electronic products?”

            Benjamin Cole suggested above that the only things still made in the U.S. were those things which were “too heavy or light or bulky or law-value to ship, like styrofoam cups and paint…”. The fact is that manufacturing of computers and electronic goods in the U.S. was a $227 billion industry in 2011. That alone should show that Benjamin’s suggestion was incorrect.

            The trade deficit in advanced technology products is irrelevant to the discussion about what is produced in the U.S. That’s especially true if one understands the difference between what is counted in trade and what is counted in value added GDP.

          • Consumer and electronic products are doodads, except for the chips, much like Walmart imports consumer knickknacks. Whether the doodads or knickknacks are domestically produced or not will not increase future growth rates and standards of living. Advanced technology products (ATP) in information & communications, biotechnology & life sciences, advanced materials, etc. are innovative leading edges where innovation meets competiveness to drive productivity, future growth and living standards.

            Is the schema that complex? The trade deficit in ATP suggests that the U.S. is ceding its role as the global innovator.

          • marmico

            Consumer and electronic products are doodads, blah, blah, blah…

            It’s interesting that you believe you can decide for others what should be important to them.

            The trade deficit in ATP suggests that the U.S. is ceding its role as the global innovator.

            Nonsense. It says nothing about innovation, only that not all ATPs are made in the US, and can be produced more cheaply elsewhere.

            And why do you think it’s important that the US have a “role as global innovator” rather than as a beneficiary of that innovation, no matter where it occurs?

      • John Dewey–

        You are right, but…my TV and computer and phone were made overseas, my car too, my clothes.

        I get it that we have fossil fuels and food, and transportation equipment, and obviously fabricated metal products might be a lot of one-offs too difficult to offshore…

        You really think we are producing four times as much stuff in the USA than in 1980?

        Sheesh, in the 1960s even my bicycle and baseball mitt were “Made in the USA.”

        • Benjamin Cole: “You really think we are producing four times as much stuff in the USA than in 1980?”

          Well, Benjamin, to answer your question I would need to know what you mean by “producing” and what you mean by “stuff”. Do you think that “producing” means the same thing as “manufacturing”?

          I’m going to assume that you are referring to the chart Mark Perry provided above, and that you were referring to the manufacturing output numbers on that chart when you used the term “producing”. If that’s not what you meant, please correct me.

          I’m not familiar with the data source which Mark used. I first thought that the term. “current U.S. dollars” in the title meant that the data was not adjusted for inflation. But I’m really not sure about that.

          The Bureau of Economic Advisors does provide inflation-adjusted data for U.S. manufacturing value added. That data shows that the value added by U.S. manufacturing in 2012 was 2.4 times the value added in 1980. I do believe this number.

        • Benjamin: “You are right, but…my TV and computer and phone were made overseas, my car too, my clothes. ”

          Your car was manufactured overseas? You are an exception, then. Very few cars driven on U.S. highways were manufactured overseas. All the Japanese and U.S. brands are made here. Hyundais are built in Alabama and Kias in Georgia. BMWs are made in South Carolina. Some Volkswagens are built in Chattanooga.

          All the gasoline you buy was probably made in the U.S.

          Most of the processed food you might have in your kitchen was likely manufactured in the U.S.

          The building materials used to construct your home were probably manufactured in the good old USA.

          One more important thing to realize is that many items imported from other nations contain components made in the U.S.

          Also remember that many items manufactured in the U.S. are not sold to households. That would include all the defense industry goods as well as commercial aircraft, electricity generation turbines, and industrial machinery. I think a single jet fighter represents more value added than a million baseball gloves.

          Just because you cannot read the words “Made in USA” on your gasoline and on the electric turbine which lights your home doesn’t mean those weren’t manufactured here.

          • “All the gasoline you buy was probably made in the U.S. ”

            And for those of us that believe it is essential to keep score for the cash rewards: refined petroleum products are the #1 U.S. export.

        • bunny benji

          You are right, but…my TV and computer and phone were made overseas, my car too, my clothes.

          LOL

          Do you now regret those buying decisions? It is YOU who decided where those things would be made.

        • You really think we are producing four times as much stuff in the USA than in 1980?

          Not quite, but U.S. annual output per hour growth rate in manufacturing since 1980= 3.4%.

          Didn’t you learn the rule of 72?

    • “Are we sure that free enterprise beats fascist central planning and an accommodative central bank?”

      we’re already sure.

      take a device like a PC.

      china may get the bulk of the “manufacturing revenue” but the us takes what, 90-95% of the profit dollars from the device?

      would you rather own a company with $100 in revs and $30 in profits or one with $1000 in revs and $2 in profits?

      it’s easy to generate revenues if you are willing to lose money and or make very low margin.

      but who cares?

      a successful business is judged on profits, not revenues.

      to base an economy on profitless production is to go nowhere.

      • ““Are we sure that free enterprise beats fascist central planning and an accommodative central bank?””

        also. while china ia huge, it’s still poor.

        per capita gdp is considerably lower than mexico.

        it’s easy to make rapid gains if you are both huge (in terms of population) and incredibly backwards (due to the ravages of communism), but they are a long, long way off from being a wealthy, first world nation.

  2. #3 is an important insight into the kind of goods produced here in the US vs. China.

    China (and other SE Asia countries) rely heavily on labor intensive goods (clothing, trinkets, etc), whereas the US relies heavily on capital-intensive goods, like airplanes, chemicals, etc.

    This is a perfect example of comparative advantage and shows how everybody is made better through trade!

    • True, but we could be making more. There is a built in disincentive to manufacture in the USA due to our Dollar trade structure. We need to maintain a deficit so the rest of the world has currency to trade. To support that deficit they need to be able to sell goods below our costs. If the USA suddendly became 10x more productive, the value of the currency would be bid up until the outflow of dollars matched the demand again, and those competative companies would be at a disadvantage yet again.

      We need to stop having the US dollar as the global currency and switch to one of those basket of good models. Being world currency helped in the 1970′s and 80′s when we could get world resources for lower price, but now it is backfiring by dragging our economy.

      • marque2,

        I do not understand your argument. If foreign companies sell us goods at artificially low prices, how does that hurt our economy? If the golf balls I purchase are $10 a dozen cheaper because they were manufactured in China, that just gives me $10 more to spend on fajitas at Chili’s. If the 60 inch television I buy is $1,000 cheaper because it was assembled in China, that just means I have $1,000 more to spend on my Scottsdale vacation. How does importing low priced goods do anything other than increase the standard of living of American consumers?

        • It is a long argument. I will see if I can come up with a longer explanation tonight.

          But basicially it boils down to this. Distorted markets, especially those distorted by artifical government connivances are not good.

          To set up a system that permanetly overvalues one currency by 20% – 40% against the rest of the world’s currencies due to an artifical forced trading scheme is eventually destructive to the host country – it has happened before most notably, to England, and Spain. They fall and the next country takes over, and reaps benefits for about 40 years, and then the next country takes over. Next in line now looks like China.

          • margue2

            But basicially it boils down to this. Distorted markets, especially those distorted by artifical government connivances are not good.

            Absolutely. Government interference in markets is always a negative, and I would prefer no government involvement at all, but in the case of international trade, the current scheme benefits US consumers at the expense of others.

            As John pointed out, consumers benefit from lower prices, and that’s always a good thing no matter what the source. Of course the foreign counter-parties in those exchanges are harmed by the same amount.

            I recall the outcries in in the 1980′s against Japanese government subsidies of Japanese automakers, calling it “Unfair competition”. In reality all those Japanese taxpayers were helping me pay for my car.

            Thank you all, whoever you are.

          • Ron writes: “I recall the outcries in in the 1980′s against Japanese government subsidies of Japanese automakers, calling it “Unfair competition”. In reality all those Japanese taxpayers were helping me pay for my car.”

            Ron, was not “Unfair competition” really the elimination of U.S. vehicles from the Japanese market?,

            Some of the unfair and onerous schemes have been:

            1. The tear-down of each U.S. made vehicle for inspection, coupled with ever-changing certification standards by the Japanese authorities.

            2. The mandating of extremely high insurance rates for U.S. made vehicles in Japan.

          • Cit

            You are correct – further evidence that government interference in markets is always a negative. “we will limit our imports of your products because you are limiting imports of our products, nyah, nyah.” “If you punch yourself in the nose and bleed on your shoes we will punch ourselves in the nose in retaliation.”

            The losers?

            1. Consumers in both countries.

            2. Autoworkers in both countries?

            The winners?

            Other than politicians? I can’t think of any.

          • Ron, your efforts in highlighting the ridiculous non-competitive auto market in Japan, by buying a Japanese made vehicle, have resulted in some market movement…

            The U.S. gave up on any chance of change in Japan and insisted on U.S. assembly of Japanese autos by the millions after fifty years of futility…

            The flapping of U.S. dollars eventually was felt as cyclone in Japan and they relented by committing to U.S. production.

            Does anyone know of the current availability of U. S. assembled autos in Japan? Is there any whatsoever?

          • You are all missing something. If the exchange rate is correct, and a company in the US is out-competed by a foreign company great, may the best company win.

            If however, the exchange rate is goosed so the US dollar is always 20 – 40% overvalued. The American producer is now at a disadvantage. Yes it is wonderful that we were able to “steel” goods from foreign countries, and in the first 20 years or so as the world currency, that worked out great, but as our companies had a 20 – 40% trade barrier, they closed up shop because they couldn’t compete, or they too moved overseas.

            so yeah we got free goods, but we also lost industry in the process. I would much rather have our currency on equal footing and allow us to compete fairly.

            Also even if the productivity goes up in the USA, that would just cause the dollar to be valued even higher and we would lose competitiveness again.

            It works for about 40 – 50 years, but then enough industry moves away for it to be a problem.

            BTW remember all those dumping complaints in the 1980′s. It wasn’t really dumping – it was being able to sell to us for less, because of the exchange rate differences.

          • Cit

            Ron, your efforts in highlighting the ridiculous non-competitive auto market in Japan, by buying a Japanese made vehicle, have resulted in some market movement…

            I don’t know what that means.

            The U.S. gave up on any chance of change in Japan and insisted on U.S. assembly of Japanese autos by the millions after fifty years of futility…

            I don’t know about insisting, but it makes sense for Japanese automakers to build in the US as the US is their major market. This is good for everyone. It provides capital in the US and thousands of US jobs, as well as more competition and consumer choice. The only losers are Japanese consumers, and to some extent, US automakers.

            Does anyone know of the current availability of U. S. assembled autos in Japan? Is there any whatsoever?

            I don’t know, and I don’t know why anyone would care. There’s no particular reason for US automakers to sell cars in Japan. Japanese consumers, if they lack choices, should be upset with their government for playing ridiculous political games that harm them. Cars should be made by those manufacturers who best satisfy their customers needs. Period.

          • marque2

            It works for 40 – 50 years, but then enough ves away for it to be a problem.

            What problem is that? Us manufacturing has increased at an annual rate of 3.4% since 1980 and is now several times greater than it was in that year. The composition of that manufacturing has changed to more profitable goods while low margin stuff is now made elsewhere. Good riddance to those low skill low paying jobs.

            BTW remember all those dumping complaints in the 1980′s. It wasn’t really dumping – it was being able to sell to us for less, because of the exchange rate differences.

            I remember them. It was and is ridiculous to penalize US consumers for buying at the cheapest price they can find. “dumping” is a political notion, not an economic one.

  3. The graph about Germany is interesting. It shows manufacturing declining. Europe has been divesting itself of manufactuing ability in the name of preventing Global warming. shutting down a factory in Germany gets you carbon credits, and then you open a plant that makes the same thing in China which doesn’t have carbon credit limits.

    It is a perverse discincentive to keep Europeans employed, by shipping off their jobs to China in the name of a bogeyman.

    • I also took note of the decline in German manufacturing and was surprised.

      BMW has a lot of manufacturing in the U.S., with autos in South Carolina and carbon fiber in Washington state. I’m not sure the Bavarians get carbon credits for their U.S. efforts.

  4. Recent patent reform has left our system in ruins. New marketable job and revenue creating IP conceptions are at an all time low. New product releases are non existant or Insignificant improvements over the existing. Congress it seams could care less about the patent thieves gaining the esential shutdown of the system

    • “New marketable job and revenue creating IP conceptions are at an all time low. New product releases are non existant or Insignificant improvements over the existing”

      that’s sure not how it looks from where i sit, and i spend an awful lot of time looking at tech companies.

      you have anything to back up that statement?

      it looks like wild, unsupported conjecture to me.

      • Ya plenty to back it as I created all of the top 20 to 30,000 inventions of the last 60 years although dident recieve credit or sompensation. If you look at the top new products like popular science and other lists for the last 10 years you can see the large scale cut off of significant new marketable products coming on market progressing through the decade. The tv news girls that gave the new product updates weekley on local television are all laid off now because nothing is hapening due to the disincenives to create of the old and new patent system like the 40 mthods of cheating the inventor of his IP has made the filing of patents pure stupidity. I am afraid you dont know where to look for downturn symptoms because the evidence is overwhelming all around.

        • um, wow.

          those are some serious ramblings.

          and where is your evidence on patents?

          i have spent the last 20 years investing in tech, and today does not seem that different from most of that period.

          it’s not the outlandish boom that came with the rise of the internet, but if you think there is no interesting new tech coming out, i think it is you who do not know where to look.

          i’m finding plenty.

          • also:

            “Ya plenty to back it as I created all of the top 20 to 30,000 inventions of the last 60 years although dident recieve credit or sompensation”

            did you seriously just claim to have invented ALL of the top inventions of the last 60 years?

            was that some sort of typo or is this some sort of dr evil’s dad sort of claim about inventing the question mark?

          • I invented tech and everything of significance since then as far as original conception without which it would not exist. What items of significance do you think have come out in the last 3 years say that are not minor subinvention or design improvement or experimental observations.

          • nice catch ron.

            wow, that is some seriously bizarre conspiracy rambling.

            “Buy with confidence from my company. My genetic historical chain of grandfathers has, for 2,500 years, produced all of the major inventions in this time frame, arguably. Throughout history, the royal families have produced high genetic quality offspring. These royal families represent the world’s top genetic codes for invention in each of their respective countries. I am a cross between nine major royal families of Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. The inventing ability of my grandfathers increased as each new royal family was added to the genetic code producing today’s world top inventor in every conceivable category of invention and beyond. In modern times these genetic combinations in my family have formed many presidents in the United States, including the Bushes, Reagans, and the Kennedys, as direct relatives, and the Gerald Ford (Royals), Nixons, Johnsons, Washingtons, and VanBurens, as distant relatives. My royal heritage includes the King of Poland, King James, also the 7th Century King of Spain, King of France, King Louie of France, Czar of Prussia and through the Nicholas Family, Emperor of China 14th Century Jengus Kahn, King Oglesby of the Netherlands, King Edda of Germany and Princess Queen Charlotte, King Henry of England from the Hull Family, King Georges and King Arthurs from the Roberts Family, all from England, also related to the Saudi and Egyptian Kings through King Edda, Czar Nicholas King Louie, King Arthurs, and King Georges. Also, I am related to my Great Uncle Albert Eisteinmembers of my family are related to Albert Einstein, Sir Isaac Newton, Sherlock Holmes, and some of our prominent movies stars and musicians. Many people have never heard of or don’t want to believe in the theory of royal permanence. Simply stated, it says “There is only one inventor on earth at a time and no other is capable of producing previously unknown innovative ideas.” I began inventing major items from the infant crib at one month of age or before.”

            it just keeps getting better.

            wow.

            this is some amazing stuff.

            so, we are to believe that this family was so brilliant that they have invented every meaningful things for 2500 years, but too inept to manage to get paid for their creations?

            lol.

            this is awesome.

            thanks ron.

            i’m going to enjoy reading this.

          • Ya thats right I and three grandfathers have invented everything since the the invention of fire and metal in 1804-5. There was little before that though just the 1768 invention of the bow and arrow but that was kept secret

          • Ron and morgan, Mikey does provide an asterisk to the claims:

            “Note: This web page is currently under development. We believe the accuracy of the text to be in excess of 80%.”

          • My website is not a bizarre consperacy or rambeling its is the history of the high Federals and high royals in north America. Ya right so briliant they and myself invented everything in history

          • Ya go ahead and name some items and I can give you the true story of their conceptions. Dont be shy about the old ones because thousands of them have been run back in time to add to the consperacy to defraud.

          • it gets better:

            “Metallurgy (1805-1822): The invention of malleable iron in 1805 occurred at 10th and Military St. With the invention of horse drawn drag cultivators 1819, also came the invention of cast iron and the method of making it including the mixing of carbon into metal. Isaiah’s invention of steels in 1822 established the spectrum of carbon mixing. ”

            malleable iron goes back to the 4th century BCE.

            it was mentioned in a patent in england in 1670.

            i have not found the question mark yet, but i’ll keep looking.

          • “Two Story Houses: They were invented at the Hillman/Roberts House in 1819-1840 at the corner of Roberts Road and Hewitt Road, in the Avoca area of Michigan. ”

            truly amazing to have done so just 17 years after discovering north america (and so far inland).

            odd as i grew up in a colonial town in Connecticut that has a 3 story inn from 1776 ish and a house at the end of my road with 2 stories that dated from maybe 1770?

            i seem to recall being in some considerably older ones in stratford upon avon.

          • “Ya right so briliant they and myself invented everything in history”

            except, it would appear, grammar?

          • You have to begin with that the Wicki is a sickie when invention history is a concern. Ya the bow and arrow was never available until around 1957 with my invention of Bear archery company Greyling Mi. That fricus in 1776 was actually the articles of confederation in 1830 with backdating to 1776 so the new citizens arriving would have a sence of law and order. Never was a war or anything

          • um, you claimed to be related to sherlock holmes.

            he’s a fictional character.

            an honestly, it’s more believable than the bow and arrow claim.

            so agincourt never happened?

            the battle of hastings?

            the native americans were not using them long before you claim your family discovered america (in 1804 was it?)

            wow, this is some amazing stuff.

            all that history, down the tubes.

            when did you guys invent the question mark?

          • morganovich

            thanks ron.

            You’re welcome. Entertainment so early in the week!

            The best part may be that we won’t waste any more time responding with reason or logic, but can go directly it ignoring.

          • except, it would appear, grammar?

            Yes. I know for a fact that grammar was invented in 2006 by Mark Perry.

          • Cit

            Ron and morgan, Mikey does provide an asterisk to the claims:

            “Note: This web page is currently under development. We believe the accuracy of the text to be in excess of 80%.

            Yes, most words appear to be spelled correctly, and sentence structure isn’t too bad.

          • Very interesting observation about the claim of the worlds first settlement being so far inland Poirt Huron Mi. It reinforces my contention that settlers did not come from England and Spain but George built the worlds first immigration ship in 1812 and motored back to the old world to find settlers after inventing fire metal the steam engine and sawmill. George walked in to north America as the first settler some say from England some say across the land bridge and Russia.

          • btw, michael-

            the H in ron’s name stands for “hammencheesensen”.

            his grandfather invented the ham and cheese sandwich both swiss and cheddar and both white bread and rye and i believe ron still lives on the royalties of all combinations thereof.

            you should really ask him about licensing.

            those guys are very good at it.

          • Ya I invented some large scale improvements on grammer in history some say I invented communicable language when I did the Dick and Jane easy reader book series in 1st grade and in 7th grade I did the invention of the complete sentence with noun verb and adjitive I flunked spelling frequently though.

          • Hammerencheesenson Hugh? I invented both all meats for human consumption and all dairy products and most all compinations of then including the sandwitch period and anything else for human consumption except my great great grandfathers 1819 invention of unleven break your teeth rock hard bread.

          • Before I started inventing in 1954 after being born in Nov of 1953 people ate only rock hard bread and water. The water was sucked up from the bottom of a shallow hole by inserting your snout in the water at the bottom because there was no glass or vesel to hold water. Before George my great great grandfather invented cultivation and wheat and the water powered grist mill and wood coal oven. The human diet previously to 1819 was exclusively grubs and snakes foraging and raw consumption.

          • the H in ron’s name stands for “hammencheesensen”.

            his grandfather invented the ham and cheese sandwich both swiss and cheddar and both white bread and rye and i believe ron still lives on the royalties of all combinations thereof.

            you should really ask him about licensing.

            That’s right: Us hammencheesensens (notice that’s a lower case h) really know our stuff when it comes to patents and licensing. If you even say “ham and cheese” in public, you owe us a royalty.

            Those sandwiches were available for individual consumption after my grandfather invented sliced bread in 1942.

            My sister is currently working on something she calls “canned beer”, but I’m doubtful it will be widely accepted. If it is, I’m sure some degenerate will invent a false history of its use to deny her rightful claim to royalties.

          • ron-

            “canned beer” sounds like it has some real promise.

            have i told you about my idea for doing something similar for small rings of pasta in a tomato sauce?

            maybe we can go in on a cannery.

          • morganovich

            maybe we can go in on a cannery.

            What’s a “cannery”? If you think it would be useful I’ll start inventing one.

          • Michael

            No No you dident invent sliced bread I did in 1954-6 at Piggely whiggely market on Gratiot ave. Detroit It was wonder bread the first storeshelf available baked good.

            If I’m not mistaken – and I never am – You invented the *plastic wrapper* for previously invented sliced bread in 1954. You called it wonder bread because customers who had previously only known hard, stale bread cried out “Oh, this bread is WONDERFUL!”.

          • it’s well known that the cannery was invented by john steinbeck in 1945 in monterrey CA.

            Oh drat!

            Well actually that may be even better. Do you think Mr. Steinbeck would be willing to let us use it?

          • ron-

            “Well actually that may be even better. Do you think Mr. Steinbeck would be willing to let us use it?”

            it’s ok.

            i have a friend at the patent office.

            we’ll just steal it.

          • That canery was not invented in 1945 I invented the first one in 1955-6 it was located in the building that later housed the worlds first botteling works the Pop shop in Port Huron Mich

          • I am not sure about the plastic bag in 1954 for bread because I dident invent plastic until 1957 the first manufacturer being Polymer Sarnia located right behind my great uncles house who was my adoptive grandfathers house that was built on the place of the worlds first log cabin construction after they tore it down.

          • I am not sure about the plastic bag in 1954 for bread because I dident invent plastic until 1957..

            You may be right. My memory isn’t what it used to be. It’s possible those first bread bags were burlap. In any case, they were a vast improvement over racks of loose slices lying around covered with ants. Customers loved them, and my bread sales soared. I sold a lot less ant spray, though.

            “…the first manufacturer being Polymer Sarnia located right behind my great uncles house”

            I once had a girlfriend named Polymer Sarnia. How do you know her, and what were you two doing behind your great uncles house? I remember she wore burlap dresses, but I didn’t know she also made bread bags.

            who was my adoptive grandfathers house that was built on the place of the worlds first log cabin construction after they tore it down.

            I always KNEW she was keeping secrets from me. That hussy!

          • No ron its likley the waxed paper bag or just the white paper bag was used I am not sure I invented that but I am certian If I dident my grandfather did. The burlap bags I invented in conection with my invention of navy beans for the care program and the conception of international trade with a group of inventions conected with ships with freighter captain Airistotle Onasis along with my invention of the Port Huron seaway terminal ropes davots anchors and winches loading crains palats fork lift trucks and container shipping

          • if the cannery had not been invented in 1945, then that gives me a great deal of new respect for john steinbeck.

            i had no idea “cannery row” was science fiction.

            man, i am really learning some stuff today.

          • Ya the canery was in 1954-5 along 12th ave. between Harker st and Mansfield or Scott avenues in Port Huron Mi. Many of the patent thefts became historically documented with the power of money to corrupt history involved. I was a little one to 2 year old who was trying to document my invention of vegetables by inventing canning and to produce revenues for myself only the business partners had other ideas like port that guy any way possible. I first concieved human consumption of vegetables at our home in grosse point woods mi. tomatos and cukumbers were my first find in the lawn at our house. Then at my great great aunts house I began one of several hundred larger clusters of invention. Here I discovered potatos carrots and celery with my invention of the first spade shovel. Then string beans beats rudabeggars. Peas was another possibley.With the potatos I invented refined sugar with a great uncle in law that became poineer sugar in croswell mi. I also invented the worlds first farm tractors Farmall brand in 1955 at the same place

          • Ya i invented beer also it was E+B brand in Port Huron with my uncle I think it was 1959-60 but it could have been later 64-66 it was at his new house after his divorce. the caned beer I did too maybe with my other great uncle in st claire shores Dee. I invented spagettie Os also I think that was at Smiths market in Port Huron. The original spagetti and ravioli I invented at Jonney Eldorados resteraunt in Ft. Lauderdale Fl. around 1956-9

    • There is a reason patents were reformed. And yes there are unintended consequences.

      What was happening was large software companies were blatantly stealing products and ideas from smaller start ups. Occasionally they would be able to win a suit under copyright, but that was rare. These companies were spending R&D and then the large companies were reaping the rewards, when the smaller companies could have used the cash cow products to develop newer ones.

      Of course all the conservatives were not saying at the time that property rights should be respected, they all said, well when the big guys steal their cash cows, the small guys should just innovate. Of course without the cash to innovate, they just went under.

      Now though these patent factories which have patents for every little minor look and feel, and process, are hurting our ability to design new products, because any new product developed, will be threatened with suits, unless the company has counter patents to protect themselves, and many of them have no idea someone else already invented, swiping at 45 degrees instead of straight across, or having rounded corners on a phone, etc.

      • Yes there certianly were and are reasons for patent reform but none were correctly adressed or included and only regression was the result. When lobying politicians with big money backing aleged integrity patent reform only coruption can be the result with the little guy being squeezed out and cival rights violated and free market capitolism crushed. They spent a billion dollers and I could have given us a perfict system for under 10 million. The idiots dont realize the need for top world inventors to create new progressive legislations so regression is all we can possibly have.

      • Without my patent reform being adopted there is no chance of integrity beginning in the system and thats the way the corrupt legislators want it. Inventorship has to be determined in the present as soon as spoken the secrecy is lost so immediate novelty check must begin now not later when all kinds of faked evidence has been created. Check of internet and worldwide patent databases will find the true conciever and get the patents in the right name preserving the incentive to create.

  5. China is doing profound damages to the US economy with their IP thieving. They wont acept immediate novelty check and lockering to determine inventorship and continue to steal and shutdown the incentive to create in inventors stagnating human advancement globaly.

  6. Ya that was quite a wile ago that the 80% accuracy was surpased its more like 95% now and perfecting. Ive had a hard time sorting my inventions in infancy and my Grandfather Delbert Roberts inventions He did the autombile and airplane.

  7. No metal invention was 1805 the year after the discovery by great great grandpa george of flint striking stones in 1804 in the flint river at Flint michigan the first dependable method of making fire and the hardest stones anywhere in the world and only ones capable of fire starting I believe? So metal and fire were impossible without them.

  8. Sherlock Holmes hum you may have hit an inaccuracy there. I invented fiction though so its highley likley I concieved that story have to work that around in my memory for a week to several years to get it to come in correctly.

  9. The question mark? I did electric typwriters for sure with my best friends mom she started IBM. I am not sure on the worlds first typewriter if it was 1954 or forward its me if 1954 back my grandfather. of course I invented the computer and every spec of it and all electronics from the 1954-5 burrows mechanical adding machine to present so thats a chunk!

  10. No Ron your not wasting time youve hit the mother load of invention. I just lost a 35 billion doller patent portfollio to lack of investors though so if your looking for the next big thing this is it. See my websites there is 5 you know ipo funder .net is the newest

  11. No no 1776 ish houses in the world. The worlds First was located at 10th and military st. Port huron mi. and was a square log structure with mud filled areas after stacking built in 1807 along with the worlds first sawmill that was also a oil well drilling rig. the worlds first steam engine and boat were built in the period also at the same location. Sawed board lumber barns began in 1819 to 22.

    • wow.

      no houses before 1807?

      what did people live in before?

      this is really opening my eyes to the grand conspiracy of historians!

      and no fire before 1800?

      now there’s a fact i suspect will surprise a great many people.

      btw, i think you may owe ron some royalties.

      his patents on the ham and cheese sandwich are quite exhaustive and have been rigorously upheld in courts.

      they even ate them at the markman hearing! (and paid ron’s grandad $1.75 if memory serves)

      • Before 1807 people lived outdoors and in hand dug holes in the ground that also served as water wells. They stayed in temperate regions so as to not freeze to death in winter. The consperacy of historians is heavely tempered with the frauds of running inventions back in time to claim conceptions fraudulenty from true concievers. Ya rons subinvention of a particular sandwich is a pail in comparison claim of invention of all the parent invention ingrediants ive done and his would not exist without mine first. I think he owes me some royalties. I invented all the junk foods also like the pizza submarine chili dog hamburger fries and fried foods soft drinks potato chips onion rings and on and on

        • I’ll be back later. I have an idea that may improve written communications. I’m going to call it “spelling”. I can see a lucrative market for my invention right here at this blog.

          • Ill certianly buy it I need it badley can you get me a brain replacement next mine is getting a bit scattered like a scarecrow. Oh ya I invented hollywood movies too and the wizzard of oz was the first I think in 1959 when I established holleywood out there

          • I think he was trying to type on his cell phone, which explains the errors. But I have no idea what he was going on about either.

          • Ill certianly buy it I need it badley…

            I’m not bradley, but I’ll try to answer your question.

            …can you get me a brain replacement next mine is getting a bit scattered like a scarecrow. Oh ya I invented hollywood movies too and the wizzard of oz was the first I think in 1959 when I established holleywood out there.

            Yes, that’s the one. I recommend you try to catch that infomercial called the “gizzard of oz”. it’s about organ transplants and I think there’s something about brains.

          • No thats all part of my human rebuilding project thats floating in outer space somewhere. If I only had a brain rebuild and total body bebuild ide be good for another 100 years but I cant find any funders for that either. There all trying to conciel who invented there stuff to greedily not share the wealth with their inventor even if it means reinvesting with me to make more profits on new ventures. Instead they want to destroy or conciel there funds to avoid judgements and congress just helps them along with corrupt legislations and a who cares attitude

          • No they havent come yet with the straight jacket but of course I invented that too. When you finally begin believing the magnatitude of my inventions you will likley need one though. Ya straight jackets and the hospital psychiatric ward i invented at port huron hospital along with the paded walls. and of course I invented the psycholigist and psychatrist both with Dr Fred Greiling in Port Huron and psychatric drugs to all for you.

          • Come to think of it, Algore didn’t get paid for inventing that interwebs thingy either. Thieves everywhere.

          • ron-

            that’s ok.

            al got paid a ton for inventing global warming alarmism, so it all comes out in the wash.

          • Thats right thieves everywhere and a congress and president helping thieves in every way possible. The patent reform was a crewl joke of regression of linventors intrests and is shutting down the patent system in voilation of the the legislators oaths to create jobs and improve the integrity of our laws.

          • After seeing the disaster of the Oboma spending programs we need legislation to prevent it from hapening again electing a president on promises of giveaways only bankrupts us further into waste fraud and coruption and cancels all the progress that could have hapened if the money had been wisley spent

          • Paul

            I invented the Joplin jacket in 1970 on Lemon ave. in Port Arthur Texas after witnessing a concert by Janis Joplin and the Full Tilt Boogie Band. Less that 1 year later some shit-kicker named George Strait stole my idea and named it after his own self.

  12. The US population was 227 million in 1980 and it is 316 million today, so you would expect out GDP to go up considerably. What is pretty cool is how incredibly efficient the manufacturing sector has become. Just imagine how much better off we’d all be if we could get rid of all the impediments the government puts in our way.

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