Economics, International economy, Pethokoukis

If you want to make an omelette … | Was Stalinism necessary for Soviet Russia’s economic development?

Image Credit: Shutterstock

Image Credit: Shutterstock

In case you were wondering:

Soviet Russia’s industrialisation was a pivotal episode in the 20th century, and economic historians have spent decades debating the role of Stalin’s policies in bringing it about. This column argues that Stalin’s industrialisation was disastrous even in purely economic terms. The brutal policy of collectivisation devastated productivity, both in manufacturing and in agriculture. The massive welfare losses in the years 1928-40 outweighed any hypothetical gains from Stalin’s policies after 1940, and Russia would have been better off under a continuation of the ‘New Economic Policy’.

“Was Stalin necessary for Russia’s economic development?” - Anton Cheremukhin, Mikhail Golosov, Sergei Guriev, Aleh Tsyvinski.

 

One thought on “If you want to make an omelette … | Was Stalinism necessary for Soviet Russia’s economic development?

  1. I never understand this liberal view that government action is necessary for economic development. Just look at the industrialization of America. Through the free market policies of Hamilton, America experienced a fast industrial boom from 1790 onwards. In 60 short years, America went from a agrarian/tradeshop economy to a vast industrial powerhouse.

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