Carpe Diem

Energy facts of the day: Shale gas production in Pennsylvania doubled last year to new record high

From The Morning Call in Lehigh Valley, PA:

1. Pennsylvania’s shale wells produced more than 2 trillion cubic feet of natural gas in 2012, continuing a trend of production growth despite fewer drilling rigs in the field.

2. New production data showed that 1.1 trillion cubic feet of gas flowed from unconventional wells in Pennsylvania during the second half of 2012.

3. The wells in Pennsylvania produced an average of 6.2 billion cubic feet of gas per day between July and December, or about 9 percent of the nation’s 70 billion cubic feet per day in gas demand in 2012.

4. The state’s shale gas production doubled between 2011 and 2012, even as the number of rigs drilling new wells in Pennsylvania dropped by almost 24 percent from 110 in 2011 to 84 in 2012, in response to lower gas prices and companies migrating to more lucrative oil shales in other states.

5. The Energy Information Administration said it expects that Marcellus Shale production will continue to grow despite relatively low natural gas prices, as drilled wells are tied to an expanding network of pipelines. It also suggested that increased rig efficiency will maintain production levels, even as the number of active rigs has declined.

6. Northeast Pennsylvania wells dominated the state’s biannual production report, as in past reporting periods. All but three of the top 25 wells were in Susquehanna or Wyoming counties. The top-producing well for the period, Cabot Oil & Gas Corporation’s A. Heitzenroder 3 well in Susquehanna County, produced 4.5 billion cubic feet of gas over six months.

7. As John Hanger pointed out about Item #6 above, that amount of gas production in just six months from just one “monster” Marcellus well is “enough gas to supply 51,724 residential customers of the Philadelphia Gas Works” for an entire year, which is one of every natural gas customers in the Philadelphia area.

6 thoughts on “Energy facts of the day: Shale gas production in Pennsylvania doubled last year to new record high

  1. 5. The Energy Information Administration said it expects that Marcellus Shale production will continue to grow despite relatively low natural gas prices…

    If Marcellus production increases other shale and conventional plays will see decreases. Domestic production is estimated to be flat, flat, flat for the next couple of years.

  2. WSJ February 14, 2013: Natural Gas Down 4%; Stockpile Drop is Smaller Than Forecast

    What I found interesting: ‘Total stockpiles fell to 2.527 trillion cubic feet, 9.7% below the record levels hit last year but 16% above the five-year average for this time of year.

    Some traders are now expecting total inventories will end the winter above 2 trillion cubic feet, a key level that would suggest the market is well supplied‘…

    Then of course there is those inane government bureaucrats that are making life and progress difficult for some…

    Associated Press February 26, 2013: Dreams of gas riches fading for NY landowners

    They’re waiting for environmental studies about the potential for groundwater contamination. They’re waiting for drilling rules and regulations to be drawn up. And most of all, they’re waiting for New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to make up his mind on whether to lift a moratorium on fracking‘…

  3. And despite all this so called US energy production boom,in 2012 we imported the most Arabian oil in nine years.Twenty five percent US oil comes from nations who would rather we die.

    • Twenty five percent US oil comes from nations who would rather we die.

      All of you collectivists need to understand that nations do not wish or act. People do. Crude sells on a world market. You buy it because you value it more than the little pieces of paper that the Fed keeps printing. That means that the transaction is beneficial to you just as it is beneficial to the seller who prefers the little pieces of paper to the oil.

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