Carpe Diem

Smackdown: John F. Kennedy vs. Milton Friedman

Today’s inauguration has been getting a lot of media attention, including many reviews of past inaugural speeches such as President Kennedy’s famous inaugural address on January 20, 1961, where he challenged Americans to “Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.”

In the year following President Kennedy’s famous inaugural speech, economist Milton Friedman challenged Kennedy’s famous statement in the introduction of his 1962 book “Capitalism and Freedom,” and suggested that Kennedy was wrong, because a “free man will ask neither what his country can do for him nor what he can do for his country.” Here’s more:

In a much quoted passage in his inaugural address, President Kennedy said, “Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.” Neither half of the statement expresses a relation between the citizen and his government that is worthy of the ideals of free men in a free society. The paternalistic “what your country can do for you” implies that government is the patron, the citizen the ward, a view that is at odds with the free man’s belief in his own responsibility for his own destiny. The organismic, “what you can do for your ‘country” implies the government is the master or the deity, the citizen, the servant or the votary.

To the free man, the country is the collection of individuals who compose it, not something over and above them. He is proud of a common heritage and loyal to common traditions. But he regards government as a means, an instrumentality, neither a grantor of favors and gifts, nor a master or god to be blindly worshipped and served. He recognizes no national goal except as it is the consensus of the goals that the citizens severally serve. He recognizes no national purpose except as it is the consensus of the purposes for which the citizens severally strive.

The free man will ask neither what his country can do for him nor what he can do for his country. He will ask rather “What can I and my compatriots do through government” to help us discharge our individual responsibilities, to achieve our several goals and purposes, and above all, to protect our freedom?  And he will accompany this question with another: How can we keep the government we create from becoming a Frankenstein that will destroy the very freedom we establish it to protect?

Freedom is a rare and delicate plant. Our minds tell us, and history confirms, that the great threat to freedom is the concentration of power. Government is necessary to preserve our freedom, it is an instrument through which we can exercise our freedom; yet by concentrating power in political hands, it is also a threat to freedom. Even though the men who wield this power initially be of good will and even though they be not corrupted by the power they exercise, the power will both attract and form men of a different stamp.

Here’s a link to the entire Introduction of “Capitalism and Freedom,” which inludes these passages about the importance of limiting government power:

The preservation of freedom is the protective reason for limiting and decentralizing governmental power. But there is also a constructive reason. The great advances of civilization, whether in architecture or painting, in science or literature, in industry or agriculture, have never come from centralized government. Columbus did not set out to seek a new route to China in response to a majority directive of a parliament, though he was partly financed by an absolute monarch. Newton and Leibnitz; Einstein and Bohr; Shakespeare, Milton, and Pasternak; Whitney, McCormick, Edison, and Ford; Jane Addams, Florence Nightingale, and Albert Schweitzer; no one of these opened new frontiers in human knowledge and understanding, in literature, in technical possibilities, or in the relief of human misery in response to governmental directives. Their achievements were the product of individual genius, of strongly held minority views, of a social climate permitting variety and diversity.

Government can never duplicate the variety and diversity of individual action. At any moment in time, by imposing uniform standards in housing, or nutrition, or clothing, government could undoubtedly improve the level of living of many individuals; by imposing uniform standards in schooling, road construction, or sanitation, central government could undoubtedly improve the level of performance in many local areas and perhaps even on the average of all communities. But in the process, government would replace progress by stagnation, it would substitute uniform mediocrity for the variety essential for that experimentation which can bring tomorrow’s laggards above today’s mean.

4 thoughts on “Smackdown: John F. Kennedy vs. Milton Friedman

    • ……once on the plantation, always on the plantation. Leave the plantation and you must be villified and destroyed. Milton Friedman is right on the mark here. Unfortunately, the sheeple will never read this statement by Professor Friedman. They probably never heard of him, but ask them who is on American Idol tonight…….

  1. “Their achievements were the product of individual genius, of strongly held minority views, of a social climate permitting variety and diversity.”

    This is the underlying cause for the failings of our current higher education establishment. Higher education is now completely dominated by a repressive leftist theocracy which seeks to stamp out intellectual variety and diversity, “replacing progress by stagnation”, and “substituting uniform mediocrity for the variety essential for that experimentation which can bring tomorrow’s laggards above today’s mean.”

    • I hope and pray thet General Guderian was right when he stated that, “The future will surely triumph over the perpetual yesterday.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>