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Interactive map and chart: new, common 4-year state high school graduation rates by race and ethnicity, 2010-2011

The interactive map and chart above shows four-year state high school graduation rates by race and ethnicity for the 2010-2011 school year, based on new data just released by the Department of Education. What makes these 2010-2011 data especially noteworthy is that it’s the first year that all U.S. states used a common and more accurate measure of four-year graduations that allows for comparisons between and among states. Past measures of high school graduation rates varied by state and made comparisons difficult and unreliable. Here’s some commentary by The National Journal, which created the interactive map/chart above.

Here are few interesting observations:

1. Texas has one of the highest state high school graduation rates in the country at 86%, behind only Iowa at 88% and Wisconsin and Vermont at 87%, and is tied with North Dakota, Nebraska, Indiana, and Tennessee (all at 86%), and ahead of Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts (all at 83%).

2. Texas’s graduation rate is ten percentage points higher than California’s 76% rate, and the Lone Star State graduates a higher percentage of Asians than California (95% vs. 89%), blacks (81% vs. 63%) and Hispanics (82% vs. 70%).

12 thoughts on “Interactive map and chart: new, common 4-year state high school graduation rates by race and ethnicity, 2010-2011

  1. I find it interesting that Arizona has one of the highest graduation rates for Hispanics in the country. What it is that is interesting is that Hispanics think that Arizona is out to get them.

    • “What it is that is interesting is that Hispanics think that Arizona is out to get them.”

      Yes, the Democrat nasty propaganda campaign has been very effective. My wife is Hispanic and so are most of her friends. None of them have run into any issues with 1070 here in Az.

    • “What it is that is interesting is that Hispanics think that Arizona is out to get them.”

      This is an assumption, and surely you know what happens when you make an assumption…

  2. it’s a cool map but something is broke either on my end or the Map’s end. At first thought it was flash or pop-up block problems but now not sure… does it work for others?

  3. 2. Texas’s graduation rate is ten percentage points higher than California’s 76% rate, and the Lone Star State graduates a higher pecentage of Asians that California (95% vs. 89%), blacks (81% vs. 63%) and Hispanics (82% vs. 70%).

    The problem is not graduation as much as it is literacy rates. American student performance is terrible when compared to the rest of the world once you go beyond the first few grades in school.

  4. “Yet the State, despite its failures, is consistently given a benefit of the doubt that no one would extend to actors and firms in the private sector. For instance, educational outcomes remain dismal despite vastly increased expenditures and far lower class sizes than in the past. Had the private sector presided over such a disaster, we would never hear the end of all the denunciations of the malefactors of great wealth who are keeping our children ignorant. When the government sector performs so poorly, there is silence. Silence, that is, interrupted by demands that the State be given still more resources.” — Lew Rockwell

    H/T Instapundit

  5. how do you correct for variation in state graduation standards – I think here in MA we have relatively high stds and lower rates
    if data not corrected for this, please either remove this blog post, or explain why it should remain, defective, misleading people

      • the Feds are using a standard for graduation whereas many states using different ones that cannot directly be compared.

        The graduation RATE itself is separate from the standardized testing which Feds require but leave the test itself – as well as the curriculum up to the states.

        so one state could have difficult curriculum and another an easy one – and these do affect the graduation rate.

        but the rate itself, the ones the Feds have started using is standardized in one particular way as there are about a 1/2 dozen different ways to do it.

        Most folks are not really misled – they simply do not understand the what and why – even though the info is available.

        Most folks, for instance, don’t realize that each state can and does set it own curriculum and it’s own standardized test difficulty – as well as it’s own way of measuring graduation.

        The only thing the Feds did was to adopt a particular standard then utilized each states statistics relative to the criteria in their selected standard.

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